Friday, July 29, 2011

The Debt Ceiling vs American Debts and an Amazing letter for the Love of Our Country

I find it absolutely sickening what has happened to the United States and the spot we stand, on the precipice of economic disaster as the debt ceiling looms over our heads like and old house's basement.  We as Americans have, as of late, been told to pull ourselves up by our bootstraps.  That while we may declare bankrupcy and loose sometimes our belongings and most of all our pride; that we may not easily begin the road to recovery and good credit. 

Despite my efforts at frugality, we are still battling the demon called bankrupcy.  And while the light is shining at the end of the tunnel, it has been a long journey.  We live on the cash we have.  We have no family to rely on to help with our bills if we come up short.  We have had to scrimp on health insurance to make sure we pay our bills and just do our damndest to keep healthy. 

When this is all finished, its questionable that we will be able to attain a decent loan for a new (to us) car, a home if we decide to get the heck out of Nebraska (please God!), and most of all for the restaurant that Josh and I have been dreaming of for almost 10 years now. 

According to the social morays of America we need to suck it up.  We made mistakes, now we have to suffer the consequences.  Really?  Having a premature child that required 2 weeks of hospitalization and a mother requiring 9 days as well...that was a super poor choice.  Having crappy insurance because that's what our work provides and it's all we can afford?  Again...what were we thinking?

But I digress...So why is it that Americans and America are so vastly different in the respect of how we are expected to handle our finances?  It's perfectly acceptable to the government to continue shelling out salaries to themselves (aka the root of the problem), but threaten Social Security and service men & womens wages.  It's alright to endorse pork belly politics and sneak in benefits in bills that have no business being there just so you'll vote the right way.  And here we've been fighting one of the most misguided wars in American history and just throwing money away left and right.  But instead of an immediate withdraw of troops.  Cutting funding for unnecessary projects and committees or revaming broken programs the solution is to tell Grandma Mabel that she cant afford her heart medication next month because her social security check isn't in the mail? 
What a disgusting double standard. 

I've been disappointed with our government for as long as I could understand that they were working for themselves and not their constituents.  But at this point it's just disrespectful of the American people  as a whole. 

When did the government stop being something worth being proud of and fighting for?  When did what the United States stands for become corruption, greed and capitalism at its worst.  When did the American people take a backseat to the government's agenda?

With all of that said, I am now going to include a letter that http://www.foxnews.com/ (barf), posted recently.  Not only is this one of the finest pieces of writing I have ever had the chance to read, but it quite simply demonstrates the changes in the perception of what is truly worth fighting and dying for.  America used to be a beacon of hope, freedom and wisdom beyond religion and partisan politics.  As Major Sullivan Ballou so finely transcribes,
If it is necessary that I should fall on the battlefield for my country, I am ready. I have no misgivings about, or lack of confidence in, the cause in which I am engaged, and my courage does not halt or falter. 
I know how strongly American Civilization now leans upon the triumph of the Government, and how great a debt we owe to those who went before us through the blood and suffering of the Revolution. And I am willing -- perfectly willing -- to lay down all my joys in this life, to help maintain this Government, and to pay that debt. 

It is an absolute shame that the country we now live in does not instill this kind of passion any longer.  Even though I was raised in a household that too America and patritotism very seriously, even I cannot hold a flame for Old Glory in my heart quite the way I used to.  So read on friends.  Be inspired and hope that some day in our near future America and Americans can once again give us something to be proud of. 


Below is the letter of Major Sullivan Ballou of the Union Army's Second Regiment, Rhode Island Volunteers, to his wife Sarah days before he was killed in the Battle of Bull Run. Ballou wrote the letter on July 14, 1861 while awaiting orders that would take him down to Manassas, Virginia where he was killed on July 28.  Ballou, 32, was a lawyer and father of two small boys, Edgar and Willie, who volunteered to fight for the Union Army. 

My very dear Sarah: 
The indications are very strong that we shall move in a few days -- perhaps tomorrow. Lest I should not be able to write you again, I feel impelled to write lines that may fall under your eye when I shall be no more.
Our movement may be one of a few days duration and full of pleasure -- and it may be one of severe conflict and death to me. Not my will, but thine O God, be done. 
If it is necessary that I should fall on the battlefield for my country, I am ready. I have no misgivings about, or lack of confidence in, the cause in which I am engaged, and my courage does not halt or falter. 
I know how strongly American Civilization now leans upon the triumph of the Government, and how great a debt we owe to those who went before us through the blood and suffering of the Revolution. And I am willing -- perfectly willing -- to lay down all my joys in this life, to help maintain this Government, and to pay that debt. 
But, my dear wife, when I know that with my own joys I lay down nearly all of yours, and replace them in this life with cares and sorrows -- when, after having eaten for long years the bitter fruit of orphanage myself, I must offer it as their only sustenance to my dear little children -- is it weak or dishonorable, while the banner of my purpose floats calmly and proudly in the breeze, that my unbounded love for you, my darling wife and children, should struggle in fierce, though useless, contest with my love of country? 
I cannot describe to you my feelings on this calm summer night, when two thousand men are sleeping around me, many of them enjoying the last, perhaps, before that of death -- and I, suspicious that Death is creeping behind me with his fatal dart, am communing with God, my country, and thee. 
I have sought most closely and diligently, and often in my breast, for a wrong motive in thus hazarding the happiness of those I loved and I could not find one. A pure love of my country and of the principles I have often advocated before the people and "the name of honor that I love more than I fear death" have called upon me, and I have obeyed. 
Sarah, my love for you is deathless, it seems to bind me to you with mighty cables that nothing but Omnipotence could break; and yet my love of Country comes over me like a strong wind and bears me irresistibly on with all these chains to the battlefield. 
The memories of the blissful moments I have spent with you come creeping over me, and I feel most gratified to God and to you that I have enjoyed them so long. And hard it is for me to give them up and burn to ashes the hopes of future years, when God willing, we might still have lived and loved together, and seen our sons grow up to honorable manhood around us. 
I have, I know, but few and small claims upon Divine Providence, but something whispers to me -- perhaps it is the wafted prayer of my little Edgar -- that I shall return to my loved ones unharmed. If I do not, my dear Sarah, never forget how much I love you, and when my last breath escapes me on the battlefield, it will whisper your name. 
Forgive my many faults, and the many pains I have caused you. How thoughtless and foolish I have oftentimes been! 
How gladly would I wash out with my tears every little spot upon your happiness, and struggle with all the misfortune of this world, to shield you and my children from harm. But I cannot. I must watch you from the spirit land and hover near you, while you buffet the storms with your precious little freight, and wait with sad patience till we meet to part no more. 
But, O Sarah! If the dead can come back to this earth and flit unseen around those they loved, I shall always be near you; in the garish day and in the darkest night -- amidst your happiest scenes and gloomiest hours -- always, always; and if there be a soft breeze upon your cheek, it shall be my breath; or the cool air fans your throbbing temple, it shall be my spirit passing by. 
Sarah, do not mourn me dead; think I am gone and wait for thee, for we shall meet again. 
As for my little boys, they will grow as I have done, and never know a father's love and care. Little Willie is too young to remember me long, and my blue-eyed Edgar will keep my frolics with him among the dimmest memories of his childhood. 
Sarah, I have unlimited confidence in your maternal care and your development of their characters. 
Tell my two mothers his and hers I call God's blessing upon them. 
O Sarah, I wait for you there! Come to me, and lead thither my children. 
Sullivan


Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/07/28/major-sullivan-ballous-letter-to-wife-sarah/#ixzz1TV0GSM5R

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